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Review: Kash Doll’s Cypher Verse at the BET Hip Hop Awards

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Kash Doll

https://twitter.com/kashdoll/status/916770311307235329

 

Being invited to the Hip Hop Awards to participate in a cypher full of capable female rappers is an honor that Kash Doll received, and rightfully upheld, in her brief appearance. She was able to smash the competition by doing what she does best; battering the microphone until it’s rendered useless. Props to whoever had to come after her after she slaughtered the competition the way that she did.

It all started with her choice of outfit. Whereas most emcees go to ciphers in some sort of hardcore ensemble (usually consisting of shirts, pants, and tennis shoes), Kash Doll showed up and kept it all the way sexy. She wore exactly what she’s accustomed to – tight dresses, high heels, and finely done makeup. She looked amazing, more so an attendant at the Met Gala than one of the best rappers at the BET Hip Hop Awards. Her mink jacket was what cemented her as the person to beat.

When she opened her mouth, it’s safe to say that if you didn’t know who she was prior to that, you do now. She came in hard, fast, and brutal. “I’m a very rich chick, on my NeNe Leaks/I’m a boss, every move gotta come through me” she raps with gusto as she walks around fearlessly. She just goes and goes to the point that when the verse is over, you can’t help but smile.

From punchlines to sheer wit, her verse was something that Hip Hop sorely needed – bars; a generous helping at that. She put on for Detroit in ways that will bring an even larger spotlight onto the city’s lucrative rap scene. Props to Kash Doll for doing what she does best. It’s great that the world is finally seeing what we knew all along.

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Review: “Pull Up N Wreck” by Big Sean ft 21 Savage (prod. by Metro Boomin)

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It’s always nice to hear Big Sean switch from sullen, introspective mode to the loose, thrill-seeking rapper that we grew to love over the course of a couple of mixtapes and a few albums. With a self-focus aspect that permeated the subject matter of his last release, I’m Decided – save for a handful of singles made for radio – his new release “Pull Up N Wreck” is a welcome look into a more enjoyable style of rap that we’ve missed.

Sean makes two decisions that define the track, making it one of the better of his last releases. The first is that he brings in superstar producer Metro Boomin to handle the production. It’s faster than what Boomin’s usually darker, more foreboding, style of beats usually entails. It’s jumpy, crass, and yet, soothing. It’ll definitely garner some spins at a party, something that previous releases like “Bounce Back” and “Moves” somewhat struggled with. The second decision is to feature a guest verse from Atlanta-rapper 21 Savage, who brings in his effortless, grimacing style of rap. 21 raps at a brisk pace, utilizing his usual array of street raps. It’s largely the same, but it works.

Combining these elements together, along with some creative bars from Sean himself, creates a track that works on multiple levels. It may not be his most lyrical or his most entertaining party-grabbing anthem, but it’s solid nonetheless. With it coming so soon after the release of I Decided – which just recently went platinum – is it an indicator of another project? If so, we’re ready to see if the fun-loving style of “Pull Up N Wreck” will be a consistent theme of the project or just an isolated instance.

Score:

3.9/5

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Review: Tee Grizzley’s “Grizzley Gang” is a resounding statement of superiority

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“Hov told me quit puttin’ that money to my ear/ I gotta get used to this shit, I’m just now gettin’ here” opens up Tee Grizzley’s long and intense verse on “Grizzley Gang.” It shows his youthful view of the game; yes he likes money phones but he is just now getting here. We can’t judge him for these actions, but we can judge him for his rhymes. And that’s what makes Grizzley Gang a resounding triumph – it’s an exercise in expressing supremacy in a game full of fakes. It’s my favorite of Grizzley’s growing catalog of bangers because of the raw veracity of its lyrics.

The Bay Area of California is the antithesis of Detroit. Both areas provide drastically different sounds; Detroit’s dragging, pounding beats contrast with the light-hearted, swift nature of the Bay Area’s notable sound. Helluva, one of Detroit’s most notable producers, has managed to bridge the connection between both cultures with a sound that’s both derivative of their individual styles yet wholly original at the same time. This new sound provides the backdrop for Grizzley to smash through any semblance of  rapping restraint, roaring mightily.

The one, extended verse that we get is nearly legendary. Grizzley’s the king of no chorus verses and he makes it clear here that there’s no one around that can top him. By the end of the relatively short release, we’re eager for more.

Grizzley once again lets us know that he’s superior in every way to the scores of artists who attempt a similar style that he exhibits. It’ll surely hold the world over until the release Tee Grizzley and Lil Durk’s collaborative mixtape that comes out on December 8.

Check out “Grizzley Gang” below:

 

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Review: “Cold Summer” by Jeezy ft. Tee Grizzley

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Street rappers make the best music, DJ Drama said it best. The language he used may have been more colorful, but in the end, the fact remains true that rappers who come from the struggle often times make the best music available. This effect doubles when two of those artists come together for the same track. Jeezy’s “Cold Summer” featuring Tee Grizzley is an indicator of that: two wordsmiths from two very different areas use an angry beat to describe a similar street experience that transcends their locations.

Jeezy’s continued relevance is something that many artists of his age bracket often struggle with. He manages to stay on the tip of peoples’ tongues because he’s able to compete at the lyrical level of the younger generation without coming off as corny or out of place. His street panache makes him a logical pairing for Tee Grizzley who’s youthful appearance and strong rap style are somewhat resemblant of a younger Jeezy’s own career beginnings.

The beat that they choose seems dipped in Detroit’s harsh style of bass-heavy production but laced with Atlanta’s melodic trappings, ever so lightly. Over the combined production, Jeezy and Grizzley spit some serious bars. Grizzley brings it back to Detroit with “I’m from Detroit, baby that’s a wild city/Hop on to that block party give the crowd 50” painting a harsh picture of the city’s street life. Over the course of just over three minutes, both street rappers paint vivid pictures of their lives now and the lives that they lived that made them the powerhouse lyricists they are today.

All in all, it’s a solid track that’s sure to be a single from Jeezy’s upcoming album. Check it out below:

 

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