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Review: Kash Doll’s Cypher Verse at the BET Hip Hop Awards

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Kash Doll

https://twitter.com/kashdoll/status/916770311307235329

 

Being invited to the Hip Hop Awards to participate in a cypher full of capable female rappers is an honor that Kash Doll received, and rightfully upheld, in her brief appearance. She was able to smash the competition by doing what she does best; battering the microphone until it’s rendered useless. Props to whoever had to come after her after she slaughtered the competition the way that she did.

It all started with her choice of outfit. Whereas most emcees go to ciphers in some sort of hardcore ensemble (usually consisting of shirts, pants, and tennis shoes), Kash Doll showed up and kept it all the way sexy. She wore exactly what she’s accustomed to – tight dresses, high heels, and finely done makeup. She looked amazing, more so an attendant at the Met Gala than one of the best rappers at the BET Hip Hop Awards. Her mink jacket was what cemented her as the person to beat.

When she opened her mouth, it’s safe to say that if you didn’t know who she was prior to that, you do now. She came in hard, fast, and brutal. “I’m a very rich chick, on my NeNe Leaks/I’m a boss, every move gotta come through me” she raps with gusto as she walks around fearlessly. She just goes and goes to the point that when the verse is over, you can’t help but smile.

From punchlines to sheer wit, her verse was something that Hip Hop sorely needed – bars; a generous helping at that. She put on for Detroit in ways that will bring an even larger spotlight onto the city’s lucrative rap scene. Props to Kash Doll for doing what she does best. It’s great that the world is finally seeing what we knew all along.

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@LanaLadonna’s ‘$B1glan’ is the perfect glimpse of her bold future

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There’s something of a renaissance in women’s rap. Acts like Cardi B, the City Girls, and Rico Nasty have made bold steps in reclaiming a certain vigor that past acts of the 90s made into a genre-leading niche. It’s amazing to see because we’re getting to a point where women in rap are as vast and varied as ever before and, every day, we see more exciting acts come to light.

The latest is Lana LaDonna, a Detroit-based lyricist whose bold and empowering bars remind you a bit of Cardi B, but crossed with the flair of Rico Nasty. Her latest project is $B1GLAN, a quick and dirty helping of her tremendous personality. Over quick and bombastic production, she dazzles with flurries of bars that get you familiar with who she is. And once she does, you’ll love her for it.

She has multiple voices on display, just listen to “Ykwtfgo” where she angrily prances on the beat while rapping on it. And that’s just the beginning. From there, she grows more excited. Tracks like “I’on Gaf” are spectacular party bangers where her eager screed makes you want to stop what you’re doing and turn up. And then on slightly sinister cuts like “Kill Me” she threatens with a twinkler in her eye. She varies her styles and constantly keeps you engaged.

There’s a lot to love about $B1glan, with the only seeable criticism being that it’s too short. As soon as the energy kicks up to high gear, it’s over in a flash, leaving you to wonder how the rest of this marvelous, high octane night went. That doubles as a strength though, powered by the project’s consistency that keeps you excited. So, I guess in the end, maybe that’s also a strength.

$B1glan is everything that you could want out of a project and more. Lana LaDonna creates her own style that contains bits of others, molded into something that’s every bit as energetic, braggadocious, and inspiring as her peers — but also boldly original. Her rhymes are going to be inspiring the world someday soon. For now, $B1glan‘s going to have to do.

Listen to $B1glan below.

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.@MeechTheGoat’s ‘Before Chronicle’ is must-hear music

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There aren’t too many celebrities out of Kansas City, save for Ellie Kemper of The Office fandom. There definitely aren’t any rappers. TXYLOR is looking to change that though and his new release, Before Chronicle, shows that he definitely has the chance. With vast and varied production, the rising rapper shows that with a little tempering, he’ll take over before you know it.

TXYLOR comes from the school of conscious, authentic raps that artists like J. Cole and Kendrick Lamar have cultivated over the course of their careers. Songs like “24 Trillion Miles” paint a picture of the path he’s taken, with great care to contextualize his pain and struggles through hefty bars that deliver a punch. Another track like “Move Around” is more sinister and bleak so his delivery reflects this, with emotional bars that ask for space. Its anxious mood is drastically different from the first. You pick up on the diversity and are sucked in. This is someone who understands poise and the importance of presence.

But everything isn’t a tale of the two extremes. TXYLOR’s strengths come from how he can make relatable raps in all forms. “Go” is a trap-adjacent jam that talks about the authenticity of the people around him. He keeps it real as he lists off the different kinds of fake. He gets introspective on “No Cure For A Cold Heart” when he talks to the people in his life – both here and departed – as he lets them know how it is. By covering multiple bases like this, his versatility becomes the star of the project and leaves him ringing in your ears way after it cuts off.

Before Chronicle is supposedly a preview before he releases an album called Chronicle. With this kind of wide-ranging effort on just a preview, we can imagine what’s going to be on the first. It makes you want to figure out more about this mysterious artist and see what he has going on. Before Chronicle is definitely what you need to learn more about TXYLOR.

Stream Before Chronicle up above.

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Here’s The Verdict on Joey Purp’s ‘QUARTERTHING”

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Joey Purp’s a member of the SaveMoney crew – a Chicago based collective featuring the likes of Chance The Rapper and Vic Mensa amongst other eclectic musicians – and brings a striking new element to Chicago’s music scene. When he released iiiDrops in 2016, although his sophomore project, the world was given a proper introduction into his world of street adjacent raps. He showed his ability to be introspective over a wide selection and variety of ethereal beats. His new project QUARTERTHING continues this creative selectiveness with a newfound commitment to innovation.

Over the course of its runtime, the unique cadence and flow he utilizes to channel excitement constantly grows and evolves. On tracks like “Elastic” and “Godbody Pt. 2,” Purp’s tenacity shines through the refracted lens of eclectic beat selection. Confidence is the main currency being traded on QUARTERTHING. “2012,” the album’s most nostalgic cut, even retains some of this aesthetic that helps to build immersion.

Although much of it the project is powerful, there’s a glaring misstep. “Bag Talk” has a yelling problem; one that the album tries its best to mask throughout with loud beats. But “Bag Talk” peels the veil back to showcase just how empty it sounds without the extra bells and whistles.

Nevertheless, QUARTERTHING is a powerful project that continues to showcase some serious growth for Purp. He’s proving himself to not only be one of SaveMoney’s best, but Chicago’s as well.

 

 

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