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.@MeechTheGoat’s ‘Before Chronicle’ is must-hear music

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There aren’t too many celebrities out of Kansas City, save for Ellie Kemper of The Office fandom. There definitely aren’t any rappers. TXYLOR is looking to change that though and his new release, Before Chronicle, shows that he definitely has the chance. With vast and varied production, the rising rapper shows that with a little tempering, he’ll take over before you know it.

TXYLOR comes from the school of conscious, authentic raps that artists like J. Cole and Kendrick Lamar have cultivated over the course of their careers. Songs like “24 Trillion Miles” paint a picture of the path he’s taken, with great care to contextualize his pain and struggles through hefty bars that deliver a punch. Another track like “Move Around” is more sinister and bleak so his delivery reflects this, with emotional bars that ask for space. Its anxious mood is drastically different from the first. You pick up on the diversity and are sucked in. This is someone who understands poise and the importance of presence.

But everything isn’t a tale of the two extremes. TXYLOR’s strengths come from how he can make relatable raps in all forms. “Go” is a trap-adjacent jam that talks about the authenticity of the people around him. He keeps it real as he lists off the different kinds of fake. He gets introspective on “No Cure For A Cold Heart” when he talks to the people in his life – both here and departed – as he lets them know how it is. By covering multiple bases like this, his versatility becomes the star of the project and leaves him ringing in your ears way after it cuts off.

Before Chronicle is supposedly a preview before he releases an album called Chronicle. With this kind of wide-ranging effort on just a preview, we can imagine what’s going to be on the first. It makes you want to figure out more about this mysterious artist and see what he has going on. Before Chronicle is definitely what you need to learn more about TXYLOR.

Stream Before Chronicle up above.

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Here’s The Verdict on Joey Purp’s ‘QUARTERTHING”

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Joey Purp’s a member of the SaveMoney crew – a Chicago based collective featuring the likes of Chance The Rapper and Vic Mensa amongst other eclectic musicians – and brings a striking new element to Chicago’s music scene. When he released iiiDrops in 2016, although his sophomore project, the world was given a proper introduction into his world of street adjacent raps. He showed his ability to be introspective over a wide selection and variety of ethereal beats. His new project QUARTERTHING continues this creative selectiveness with a newfound commitment to innovation.

Over the course of its runtime, the unique cadence and flow he utilizes to channel excitement constantly grows and evolves. On tracks like “Elastic” and “Godbody Pt. 2,” Purp’s tenacity shines through the refracted lens of eclectic beat selection. Confidence is the main currency being traded on QUARTERTHING. “2012,” the album’s most nostalgic cut, even retains some of this aesthetic that helps to build immersion.

Although much of it the project is powerful, there’s a glaring misstep. “Bag Talk” has a yelling problem; one that the album tries its best to mask throughout with loud beats. But “Bag Talk” peels the veil back to showcase just how empty it sounds without the extra bells and whistles.

Nevertheless, QUARTERTHING is a powerful project that continues to showcase some serious growth for Purp. He’s proving himself to not only be one of SaveMoney’s best, but Chicago’s as well.

 

 

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Review: Kash Doll’s “Ice Me Out”

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Kash Doll’s latest release “Ice Me Out” is the signal of a new age for the Detroit paragon. Her raps have been traditionally delivered in luxe instrumentals, with powerful punchlines being delivered in louder tones. She’s like a female Meek Mill, only more cunning and intimate while keeping the garish tone. “Ice Me Out” changes the perception surrounding her rhymes tremendously. It’s a bold change that works out in the long run.

When Kash Doll steps into the booth, you know you’re going to get something fiery. Just listen to “Check,” one of her previous releases from a few months ago, and you’ll find the energy that she raps with to be mesmerizing. But “Ice Me Out” travels in the opposite direction from the sentiment made evident in the first release. Here, Kash Doll is much quieter, more intimate than ever before. Also, the instrumental she chooses is barebones, enabling her tantalizing lyricism to stand out in bold, exciting ways.

If you’re open to change, than “Ice Me Out” is the Kash Doll track for you. It’s much different than her past releases and gives her a platform to build her aesthetic from. It’ll be interesting to see how it grows from here.

Listen to “Ice Me Out” below.

 

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Bandgang’s ‘In Too Deep’ is a hard-hitting opus

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Bandgang’s latest project In Too Deep is the kind of hard hitting street record that everyone needs to hear. Street albums often rotate in and out of importance when the next one comes. Think about any Gucci Mane project ever. Once the next one comes, they’re often left to reside in nothingness until they become unpopular again. But not this time – In Too Deep is hard, brutal, and sits with you long after it goes off. It’s the kind of record that’ll keep you up at night when thinking about its dark intricacies. I can’t say too many other albums have had me in a similar manner.

In Too Deep is a long collection of street raps – nothing more, nothing less. These bangers come in three shapes – fast, Detroit-level knockers, slower, more thought-out hits, and plodding, introspective tunes. All three hit equally as hard. “Come From That” moves at a frighteningly fast pace with bombastic production that makes it a treat to get through. “At My Door” is a little bit slower, but equally as hard. The magnetic nature of the songwriting make each cut a treat to get through.

As far as weak spots, there aren’t any. The project’s power comes in its consistency, so, while no two songs sound the same, they carry a similar energy that makes them equally listenable. This is some of Bandgang’s finest work and you can hear the time that they spent perfecting each rime from the outside. Since it sticks with you when you turn it off, you’ll be more than excited to queue it up again. It’s the gift that keeps on giving. In Too Deep is exactly what you need to survive in these streets.

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