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Sada Baby’s new project D.O.N. is finally here

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To know Sada Baby and his music is to love him. His knack for producing catchy singles, exhibiting outrageous amounts of charisma and containing enough creativity in one cuticle that outshines many of the genre’s elite has made him one of the brightest rising stars out of Detroit. His association with breakout star Tee Grizzley has helped to further his burgeoning superstar status. This may be the tape that brings him to mainstream success.

The project, D.O.N (Dat One Nigga) is seventeen tracks long and is divided into two separate projects; a double disc, if you will. “The first ten songs are #SkubaSteve the last seven are #SkubaRuffin the ppl who really know and love my music understand what just was explained,” he elaborated in a post on Instagram. Out of the 17 songs on the project, there are only two additional artists (Ashley Sorrell and Motown Ty) featured.

Upon first listen, it sounds as if this will be a fan favorite. It showcases the wildly eclectic style of Sada and we can’t get enough of it.

Check out the tracklist and stream D.O.N.  below:

1. “Eastside Jump Shot”
2. “21 Skuba”
3. “Timeline Tough Guys”
4. “Guatemalan”
5. “Death Row”
6. “First Sunday”
7. “Smokin Aces” Feat. Ashley Sorrell
8. “In Jig’s Voice”
9. “Big Squad”
10. “Detroit Red”
11. “Shabooya” Feat. Motown Ty
12. “Skuba Sauce”
13. “Heart Auction”
14. “Sorrell Inc.” Feat. Ashley Sorrell
15. “Ghetto Champagne”
16. “Permanent Gang Kings”
17. “Percosex”

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Review: Tee Grizzley and Lil Durk’s “Bloodas” is a dark, autotune trip into fraternalism in the streets

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When Tee Grizzley and Lil Durk announced that they were working on a joint project, the rap world was understandably confused. Both artists come from different areas and gave no inkling that they were in cahoots with each other, outside of praise on social media being lauded towards each other. Even when listening to the individual rap styles of the two, it’s hard to imagine how they could coexist with each other. Tee Grizzley’s machine-gun delivery contrasts with Durk’s more melodic, lovingly crafted style of rap. How could the two work together on one song – let alone, a whole album?

Henceforth, Bloodas. It’s a ton of things – probably best described as a hurricane of emotions, fast-paced music, and conflicting styles. While much of it may bleed together in terms of beat choices, the project is strong in what it represents for hip-hop and the cities of Chicago and Detroit – peaceful coexistence and a willingness to collaborate and experiment.

Tee Grizzley is the anchor of the project, diligently punching into each beat with a delivery unlike anything else out on the market. “Feed him somethin’, he gon’ turn into a leech, that’s dead weight/Dirty AR pistol, hold up, dirty SK/Let the .40 with the dick bust on ya’ll on camera, that’s a sextape” he mixes together effortlessly on the vapid cut “Dirty Stick,” one of the project’s highlights. While he brings the lyrical assault, Durk acts as the Knuckles to Grizzley’s Sonic; his autotuned vocals give the music the extra push it needs to go from good, to great. His chaotic chorus on “Ratchet Ass” is an indicator of what he brings to the proceedings; controlled anarchy. While it may be overbearing for the course of the album in the long run – see cuts like the awkward “Melody” or “Flyers Up” where his verse can be somewhat grating – he’s a necessary presence to switch things up whenever he jumps in.

The most interesting track, by far, is “Flyers Up’ where both rappers clock in and clock out on the same track for dramatic effect. It’s done elsewhere on the album but here, it’s something special. Maybe it’s the ominous production that enables both to give some emotionally jarring performances, especially Durk who croons over Grizzley’s vocals while also giving his own contributions. It’s an oddly satisfying track with an unconventional setup. that works in the end.

With the exception of some less than stellar production, the album is a solid outing from the two. Here’s to hoping that the comradery between Tee Grizzley and  Lil Durk continues to flourish so we can receive another solid outing from the unlikely duo.

Score:

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Spotlight: “Choppa Sound” by Snap Dogg proves he’s a rockstar over trap beats

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When the term “guilty pleasure” comes to mind, cheesecake and ice cream are two common items associated with it. These things are items that we aren’t supposed to consume great amounts of, but they’re so good that we can’t help it. Snap Dogg’s “Choppa Sound” is one of our guilty pleasures – as wild as it sounds, it’s something we can’t turn off. It’s a lot of things; nihilistic, angry, and threatening, but it’s also very good. In music, that’s what matters right?

The production on the track moves along at a breakneck pace, causing it to sound somewhat disorientating outside of car speakers. This messiness seems intentional; the song itself is about loving gun sounds that are messy. Under this guise, the song is brilliant. It captures the unpredictability and lack of uniformity that comes with gunfights and weapons in general. Snap Dogg’s rhymes add the icing on the cake; he goes in hard. There’s no wonder why he is rising at the rapid rate that he is.

The visual for the track features more guns than Ammunation from Grand Theft Auto. And that’s the point; the video – and song itself for that matter – isn’t the most thoughtful song on the planet. It’s music made by someone from the streets, for the streets. It happens to be a very well put together track that checks all the boxes of becoming a mainstream hit in the near future.

Check out the video for “Choppa Sound” below.

 

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Spotlight: “Jeno Brown” by Jeno Cashh is nostalgic, yet pushes the envelope

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Jeno Cashh has been one of the hottest rappers in Detroit for some time thanks to his scorching delivery and distinctive style. He’s not afraid to switch things up at a moment’s notice; whether that’s finding inspiration outside of the city or involving concepts in his releases. He checks both of these creative boxes with “Jeno Brown,” a New Jack City inspired single that pays homage to one of the film’s most memorable scenes.

When New Jack City came out in 1991, it was unlike anything else in circulation. Its fearless portrayal of violence, sex, and drugs, was in stark contrast to the party movies like House Party that portrayed the time period as an extended festival. The movie would be an instant hit, spawning successful singles such as “For The Love Of Money” by Troop/Levert ft. Queen Latifah that would become instantly associated with the film.

“For The Love Of Money” is sampled in “Jeno Brown” and scenes from New Jack City are interspersed at certain points in the video. Certain lines of dialogue from the film are used, and the style of clothing worn by main man Nino Brown and his associates, in one of the film’s most memorable scenes, is worn by Jeno Cashh and his crew well. A lot of effort was put into seamlessly blending the two art forms to create a wholly unique product.

“Jeno Brown is an engrossing listen. Producer Antt Beatz provides Jeno with a Bay Area-influenced beat perfect for the rapper to let loose on. The bounce of it isn’t something you’d typically associate with the Midwest so it makes for a nice change of pace. Jeno does what he does best, releases a no holds barred, verbal assault sure to elicit a grin on your face.

The nostalgic feel invoked by the video’s style and unique beat choice make this one of the songs to beat this year. Jeno Cashh has released a banger that we’re sure will pick up steam in the near future.

Check out the video for “Jeno Brown” below.

 

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