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Review: Tee Grizzley and Lil Durk’s “Bloodas” is a dark, autotune trip into fraternalism in the streets

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When Tee Grizzley and Lil Durk announced that they were working on a joint project, the rap world was understandably confused. Both artists come from different areas and gave no inkling that they were in cahoots with each other, outside of praise on social media being lauded towards each other. Even when listening to the individual rap styles of the two, it’s hard to imagine how they could coexist with each other. Tee Grizzley’s machine-gun delivery contrasts with Durk’s more melodic, lovingly crafted style of rap. How could the two work together on one song – let alone, a whole album?

Henceforth, Bloodas. It’s a ton of things – probably best described as a hurricane of emotions, fast-paced music, and conflicting styles. While much of it may bleed together in terms of beat choices, the project is strong in what it represents for hip-hop and the cities of Chicago and Detroit – peaceful coexistence and a willingness to collaborate and experiment.

Tee Grizzley is the anchor of the project, diligently punching into each beat with a delivery unlike anything else out on the market. “Feed him somethin’, he gon’ turn into a leech, that’s dead weight/Dirty AR pistol, hold up, dirty SK/Let the .40 with the dick bust on ya’ll on camera, that’s a sextape” he mixes together effortlessly on the vapid cut “Dirty Stick,” one of the project’s highlights. While he brings the lyrical assault, Durk acts as the Knuckles to Grizzley’s Sonic; his autotuned vocals give the music the extra push it needs to go from good, to great. His chaotic chorus on “Ratchet Ass” is an indicator of what he brings to the proceedings; controlled anarchy. While it may be overbearing for the course of the album in the long run – see cuts like the awkward “Melody” or “Flyers Up” where his verse can be somewhat grating – he’s a necessary presence to switch things up whenever he jumps in.

The most interesting track, by far, is “Flyers Up’ where both rappers clock in and clock out on the same track for dramatic effect. It’s done elsewhere on the album but here, it’s something special. Maybe it’s the ominous production that enables both to give some emotionally jarring performances, especially Durk who croons over Grizzley’s vocals while also giving his own contributions. It’s an oddly satisfying track with an unconventional setup. that works in the end.

With the exception of some less than stellar production, the album is a solid outing from the two. Here’s to hoping that the comradery between Tee Grizzley and  Lil Durk continues to flourish so we can receive another solid outing from the unlikely duo.

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Reviews

Bandgang’s ‘In Too Deep’ is a hard-hitting opus

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Bandgang’s latest project In Too Deep is the kind of hard hitting street record that everyone needs to hear. Street albums often rotate in and out of importance when the next one comes. Think about any Gucci Mane project ever. Once the next one comes, they’re often left to reside in nothingness until they become unpopular again. But not this time – In Too Deep is hard, brutal, and sits with you long after it goes off. It’s the kind of record that’ll keep you up at night when thinking about its dark intricacies. I can’t say too many other albums have had me in a similar manner.

In Too Deep is a long collection of street raps – nothing more, nothing less. These bangers come in three shapes – fast, Detroit-level knockers, slower, more thought-out hits, and plodding, introspective tunes. All three hit equally as hard. “Come From That” moves at a frighteningly fast pace with bombastic production that makes it a treat to get through. “At My Door” is a little bit slower, but equally as hard. The magnetic nature of the songwriting make each cut a treat to get through.

As far as weak spots, there aren’t any. The project’s power comes in its consistency, so, while no two songs sound the same, they carry a similar energy that makes them equally listenable. This is some of Bandgang’s finest work and you can hear the time that they spent perfecting each rime from the outside. Since it sticks with you when you turn it off, you’ll be more than excited to queue it up again. It’s the gift that keeps on giving. In Too Deep is exactly what you need to survive in these streets.

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Review: @LaBritney_ and @kashdoll ‘s “Actin Funny” showcases two of Detroit’s premier artists at their best

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It’s nice to see women from Detroit come together and create good music. La’Britney and Kash Doll have hooked up and created a true slapper called “Actin Funny.” Over the bouncy, Bay-Area inspired production, La’Britney and Kash Doll drop off verses about how people treat them once they start getting money. Both artists breath fresh air into the tried-and-true topic and showcase their talents, also showign off some new ones.

La’Britney starts off the proceedings by singing the chorus, and, if you thought she could only sing, be prepared to be suprised. She spits a hard verse; seriously, harder than many rappers who just spit. She showcases her venomous side – her talk of guns and shootouts sounds very believable by her not forcing any images, just talking regulalry. Afterwards, Kash Doll comes in and does her thing as usual. Is it even a question at this point?

Overall, very solid record from two amazing recording artists.

Checkout “Actin Funny” below.

 

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Review: Young Roc’s “Dreams” Is Unusual, Refreshing, And Daring

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In Detroit, raw lyricism and flow are the main points of interest in the rap scene. Without either, you’re often either overlooked or chastised. But Young Roc has made a case for choosing to circumvent these rap mainstays and focus on aesthetically daring music that channels lyricism and flow through unconventional means. He traverses through songs on the backs of eclectic melodies and daring production. It’s an amazing feat that has made him someone on our “Must Watch” list. His single “Dreams” only confirms his place as one of the most creative rappers in the city.

The track’s borderline pop production is a daring choice for Roc. Knowing that due to his past music that he’ll be categorized with the more lyric-heavy artists in the city, Roc still chooses to go for the outlandish. It works in its own exciting way. Roc’s vocals on the track match the wackiness of the production, blending pop aesthetics with gritty Detroit angst. It’s a beautiful track that shows just how creative Roc can get.

Listen to “Dreams” below.

 

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