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Producer .@kylestemberger talks process, Burna Boy collab, and more in exclusive interview

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Kyle Stemberger had an amazing year last year, and the crazy thing is that he’s just beginning. He practically lives in the studio, securing collaborations with artists like Jorja Smith, Burna Boy, and Flipp Dinero, and he’s quietly on the trek to becoming one of your favorite producers – you just don’t know it yet.

We caught up with the rising producer to learn a bit about what his process is like, how he got into

What’s your approach to making beats? Does it differ from artist to artist?

It depends on where I am. If I’m just at home making beats I usually just start messing around on the keyboard or guitar until I get something I like. Sometimes, use a melody that one of my homies created, then I just add whatever drums on top of it that fit the vibe of the melody.

If i’m in the studio with an artist it really depends on who i’m working with. For example, recently I was working with one of my good friends WHATUPRG for a while on some new music and I was just cranking idea after idea out and there were a lot of those moments where something just clicks or someone has that lightbulb moment when they hear an idea. Those moments are the best to me.

How did you get into producing?

I started off playing piano when I was extremely young, like 5 or 6, then I eventually got into guitar as well since I grew up on a lot of rock music. I got into electronic music a little bit when I was in middle school and I looked up how it was made because I was curious, then ended up downloading FL Studio and watching some tutorials. I got into rap music heavily around the same time and the rest is history.

What was it like working with Burna Boy?

Unfortunately I didn’t get to actually be in the studio with him for that single. I played the guitar and did a little vocal for that record. That song is probably my favorite that i’ve ever worked on. It’s crazy to have not only Burna Boy, but Jorja Smith on it as well. I think they meshed perfectly on it.

How do you manage to land such high profile replacements?

Collaboration. Through working at my craft, I’ve been able to catch the attention and send ideas/loops to some of the biggest producers ever. Big or small, collaborating with producers will get your beats heard by more people who you may not have direct access to. As soon as I get my foot in the door somewhere and see new opportunity, I try and kick the door down and really show them my potential.

What would you say that your favorite collaboration that you’ve ever worked on is? Why?

Jorja Smith’s “Be Honest” ft. Burna Boy or Flipp Dinero’s “How I Move” ft. Lil Baby are my favorites. “Be Honest” was my first placement outside of just rap music and I’m trying to branch off this year and get some more songs done with artists people wouldn’t expect me to work with. It was my first time hearing myself on the radio as well. “How I Move” because growing up in Georgia, everyone is a fan of Lil Baby and Flipp Dinero here. A lot of people were, and still are, playing that song. It feels like my first song where people actually know it and listen to it like that, locally at least.

What do you think makes a good hit? In terms of Sonics, is it replicable? Why or why not? 

I think every “hit” is unique in its own way, most of the time one hit is not like the other. In my opinion, it has to have just the right amount of repetition and a chord progression/melody that is very memorable as well. What comes to mind is “Ransom” by Lil Tecca. You don’t hear chord progressions like that a lot in rap music, so it’s pretty unique and i’m sure just about everybody reading this has the hook or at least part of it memorized. I think it can be replicable, but it’s never gonna be as big of a hit as the original is. I think it’s best off trying to do something new and fresh.

What are you looking to accomplish this year?

I want to grow more as a producer. I want to go back to my roots and focus back in on my piano & guitar skills, definitely a lot more live instrumentation. As far as achievements, I want to work on some big pop/dancehall records and some R & B stuff. I still haven’t got that #1 yet so that’s been my driving force recently. If I keep grinding for it, even if I’m not getting it, i’ll still be having a good chance of filling up the other hundred spots. I also want to develop a new artist, I haven’t found one yet and I’m not really actively searching, just want it to happen organically. And of course I want to work harder than I did last year and blow 2019 out of the water.

Interviews

Get To Know: Ant P is Detroit’s hardest rising lyricist

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From producer to rapper: Ant P is an artist that you need to be familiar with. The Detroit-born rapper recently made tsunami-sized waves with his debut project, Bad Luck Bundy, in which he showcased his hard-nosed approach to lyricism that’s impossible to forget. To learn more about him and where he’s from, 4ShoMag sat down with him to get the scoop on one of the hottest rising artists out of Detroit.

Who is Ant P? If you had to describe yourself.

Ant P. is an Artist who grew up on the west side of Detroit off Schoolcraft. I would describe myself as “Most Known Unknown.” a rapper that’s in the city whom people know of, but may not know exactly who I am, if that makes sense.

How did you get into rap?

 I got into rap in middle school when I was primarily a producer. I was working with some artists around that time and after high school and then we ended up falling out. I remember, til this day, them telling me that I would need them. They thought that I would struggle without them. At that point, I had a chip on my shoulder to prove them wrong, so I picked up the pen and got to work. 

How would you describe your rap style? If you had to cite a few influences, who would they be?

My rap style is aggressive and straight to the point with a mixture of the aesthetic of cloud rap. I don’t sugar coat anything when it comes to it. as far as influences they are definitely out of the ordinary I will cite Sean Price, Prodigy of Mobb Deep, DMX, and Curren$y. 

What’s the Detroit rap scene like? What do you believe your place in it is?

It’s a big melting pot of everything you can think of as far as rap. You’ve got your drug rap, scam rap, street rap, cloud rap, and pure hip-hop. i’m like a chameleon as far as i can mesh with all the sounds here. The group that I’m with, Cloudcatchers, blends in with everything as well. 

Who are you looking forward to working with in the future?

There are four people in the city that I want to work with right now: Big Herk, Payroll Giovanni, Royce 5’9, and Boldy James. Nationwide, the producers that I really want to work with are Alchemist, Zaytoven, and Cardo. As far as artists go, I can say Project Pat, Jay Rock, Big Sean, Kendrick Lamar, Young Thug, Future, D’Angelo, Chris Brown, and Rihanna. It’s a lot of artists, I know, but I’m a big dreamer.

What would you consider success at this stage in your career? 

My biggest success so far is the release of my Bad Luck Bundy album and the subsequent praise that it received. It’s a great body of work that took a lot of work to complete, and I’m blessed to have a team that  to help me bring my vision to life. I’m actively sharin git by working on more content from the album, as far as videos, and will continue to push it so everyone can form their own opinion on it.

What are you working on right now? When can we expect it?

I’m working on my second album, Anti Hero, and, sonically, it’s going in a different direction than Bad Luck Bundy. I’m aiming to drop it in October but, if things change, it’ll be out in November.

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A Conversation With @LanaLadonna

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There aren’t too many rappers with a voice like Lana Ladonna’s. She cuts through the air with a fierce energy that demands to be heard whenever she drops a sixteen. Her new project, $B1GLAN, is designed to make fans feel every bit of what she has to say and how she has to say it. Inspired by artists like DaBaby and Cardi B, it’s clear that Lana’s future is unstoppable.

Ahead of the release of her new project, Lana Ladonna sat down with 4ShoMag to discuss her new project and more. Check it out below.

Who is Big Lan?

“Big Lan” is the new head bitch in charge, AND THAT’S WHAT YOU GOTTA KNOW! (Laughing but very serious), no really, Big Lan is who I feel I am at this point.

A few people, more recent than not, have called me that as kinda like a joke because I’m short as fuck in real life, but my presence isn’t. Plus, everything I do is big, DUH. I also refer to it as another personality. The woman I’ve grown to be, my interests, my expectations, my vibe, are all components of this boss ass, glamorous, fearless, relatable being that “Big Lan” encompasses.

How did you get into music? 

I’ve ALWAYS loved music. From Prince, Luther, Sade, Tina Marie, and more my mama used to play around the house to today’s artists – I’ve always spent my time listening to music. After graduating college, and knowing I wanted to be in the entertainment industry, but not knowing how in the hell I was gonna tap into it, I literally just decided one day – “I think I wanna try being an artist.” Plus, being back at home was a reality check. “Damn, my people really not rich.”

“I really gotta create the life I wanna live from the ground, up.” Of all my failed attempts post-grad (youtube talk show series, writing for baller alert, radio, etc.) it was the one thing that stuck and actually felt right. I feel like people didn’t take me seriously at first because it was so random; shit, I kinda didn’t either. The feeling my first performance gave me though, I knew this was what I wanted to do, 100%. 

What was the creative process like for #BIGLAN? What will we learn about you on the project? 

My process this time around was honestly a lot harder. With my first tape, Dumbass Niggas, Vol. 1, I was just having fun. Not to say making my new tape wasn’t fun, I just felt very pressured this time around. Like, I legit have “fans” and people checking for me. That shit had my anxiety through the damn roof.

It took me so long because I kept discouraging myself, and being all scared and stupid. After I got outta my own head some time in November, it was just the same vibe – get me a lil Henny in my system, say what I feel, and just… be myself. 

I think people will learn that 1. I really do this shit foreal, like I’m a real artist. The songs, to me, are versatile and I like that. Secondly, more of my personality shows. Naturally, because it’s more songs, but I feel like every song is relatable to men and women. I looooove to talk shit, and I think that’s why my music has sparked as quickly as it did because who doesn’t love a shit talker? In all, people are going to learn what Lana LaDonna is about! Owwee, and that I love the cash app!

What’s your recording process like? 

My recording process is…. Random. Sometimes, I like to catch a vibe, and create in the studio. Other times, I like to create in the comfort of my own room. It really just depends. There have been times where I couldn’t sleep, and I thought of one line, turned on a beat, and made a whole song. That’s what happened with “YKWTFGO.” It was like 3,4 in the morning, and I was in my bed TURNT lol I still don’t know where that energy came from. I was damn near whispering the lyrics as I was writing them because it was so late, and I stay with my mama lmfao I do though HATE a bunch of people in my session. Everybody has a suggestion lol STFU PLEASE.

Your music is very direct and to the point, confident, and unapologetic. Who inspires you? What about them do you bring to your music? 

It’s kind of cliche, but Cardi I feel like is what makes me so unapologetic with my music. Her come up via her personality is what made me ever think I could give music a try in the first place. All the artists I listen to in general inspire me though – Megan makes me wanna be in my rapping bag. Drake makes me wanna be relatable to both men and women. Da Baby makes me wanna get into the pockets of beats. Future make me wanna be… toxic and lit. Everything inspires me in some way. Plus, I’m really bold and unapologetic in real life. 99% of the things I talk about, I’ve actually experienced, felt, and/or thought at some point. I’m heavy on the no rap cap. The other 1% be me speaking this into existence.

How would you describe the Detroit music scene? How would you say that you fit into it? 

Mmmmmmmmmmm, I would describe the Detroit music scene as….. extremely diverse. We have a lot of different sounds, but some are just more popular than others. I don’t know how to describe it. We fasho have our own sound, our own wave, that’s definitely like no one else’s. People try to mimic it, but imitation is the greatest form of flattery. Detroit people talk shit all day, every day. That’s 110% where I fit in. I’m also the epitome of a Detroit woman – bold, confident, fashionable, bossy lol with the shits, you know how we comin’! *flips inches* 

I also feel like we’re kinda slept on though, but it’s cool. I’ll be helping change that real soon. 

What are you looking to accomplish with $B1GLAN?

With $B1GLAN, I wanna wake niggas up! Dumbass Niggas, Vol. 1 gave me a nice lil buzz, but I really wanna turn up foreal. I want to collaborate with other artists from the city, shit everywhere, and just expand my brand. I’m looking to accomplish overall growth with this project. Scratch that – I WILL accomplish overall growth with this project, so get you some popcorn baby, and enjoy the show! *blows a kiss* 

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@ohwoweli breaks down his beat-making process in new video

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Nobigdyl’s “Stix” is a behemoth of a banger. The rapper’s bars make for an extra helping of stylish vigor that makes it a hit, but it’s really due to the thick, pumping beat that you want to hop out of your seat and go crazy.

Thank Wow Eli for this. The 20-year-old rising artist and producer made one hell of a riveting beat with enough bass to give you heart palpitations. In his new breakdown video, he shows how he made the beat for everyone interested.

Take a look at it below.

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